The enabled services start at boot time.
The disabled service don't start at boot time, if we need them later, for some reason, they can be started manually, using the "systemctl start" command.
The masked services don't start at boot time and can't be started manually either.

To list our services, we use the below command:


To enable a service, we use the below command:


Now that our service is enabled, we would need to start it manually, using the "systemctl start" command.

Remark:

We could also use the "--now" flag, with the above command to tell "systemctl" to both enable and start the service.

The below command only disables a service, but to stop it, we will need to do it manually:


Stopping a service manually:


Remark:

Using the "--now" flag with the "disable" command will both disable and stop a service.

Masking a service make it not "start-able". We could mask a service using the below command:


To unmask a service, we use the below command:


Remark:

The "-now" flag might not work on some older version, or some distributions of Linux.
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